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Lyme Disease Treatment

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Lyme Disease Treatment

bri·o - the quality of being active, alive, spirited, and vigorous

Arizona Lyme Disease Specialist

Brio Medical’s therapeutic approach for the treatment of Lyme Disease synergizes innovative, non-toxic protocols supported by the latest research with natural healing modalities from around the world to restore your enthusiasm and vigor — your brio — for the good fight against Lyme disease.

Our expert team of Lyme literate doctors and medical staff specialize in methodical diagnostic and treatment procedures that trace your symptoms to the root cause, target the Lyme spirochetes, coinfections, and toxins from your cells while tending to your most troublesome symptoms so you can live without fear of a flare and with faith, you'll get your life back.

At Brio Medical, HOPE is our most important and practiced core value. It leaves an opening in the heart and mind that the journey through and beyond illness is possible.

We invite you to lift your spirit in optimism and join the Brio Lyme disease treatment team here in Scottsdale, Arizona for comprehensive Lyme disease care that doesn’t quit until you achieve results.

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If you’re like most of our patients, you already know a lot about Lyme disease. You might even be more informed than many medical doctors. Not only are you living with Lyme Disease, but you’ve spent countless hours poring over the latest Lyme disease treatment research in hopes of a breakthrough test that will validate your suffering or a novel therapy that’ll bring you relief.

Perhaps you were only recently diagnosed after months or years of debilitating pain, fatigue, weakness, or frightening neurological symptoms. You wouldn’t be alone. Over 70% of Lyme Disease patients see four or more doctors before receiving a correct Lyme diagnosis. Many are accused of exaggerating their symptoms or are referred to a mental health specialist.

Even with a confirmed case of Lyme disease, you may have been excused. Unfortunately, to the mainstream medical community, Lyme disease is simply an illness that’s successfully cured with a couple of weeks of antibiotics. It’s an open-and-shut case in the minds of most physicians.

The Brio Lyme team knows it’s not that simple for those living with chronic Lyme disease. We know Lyme means your quality of life, your relationships, your career, your health and well-being, your whole world suffers.

Serving as the last chance Lyme treatment center in Arizona, our practitioners recognize no two Lyme disease patients are the same. We respect every aspect of the journey you've taken to arrive at our doors and acknowledge you as an equal partner in care. We’re dedicated to unraveling the complexity of the most progressive Lyme disease cases, providing personalized care that takes your whole self into consideration...body, mind, and spirit.

What is Lyme Disease?

Lyme disease was first discovered about 30 years ago in Lyme, Connecticut. Unfortunately, since then, Lyme disease has become the most undiagnosed and untreated epidemic in the world. Many people often attribute Lyme disease to tick bites; however, recent studies have indicated that there are other ways people can get Lyme diseases such as mosquito bites, blood transfusions, and even gestationally (transmitted from mother to child).

Furthermore, Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by the spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) Lyme is consistently being misdiagnosed as a variety of ailments including but not limited to chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, ms, depression, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer's, and ALS. Lyme disease is a severe condition where the disease can affect multiple areas of the body with symptoms appearing as early as 1 to 2 weeks after being bitten. After being bitten, a telltale sign begins with a red rash or a bulls-eye red ring not necessarily exclusive to the surrounding area of the bite.

Since Lyme infections can vary, and Lyme can manifest over 100 different symptoms with no two people being the same, many physicians do not even consider Lyme disease as the problem. Even when testing is performed, standard testing misses over 90% of chronic Lyme disease cases. The reason for this is because the conventional methods of testing are designed to test for acute Lyme disease and not chronic Lyme disease.

Lyme Disease is an infection caused by bacteria from the genus Borrelia. Also known as Lyme Borreliosis (LB), it’s the most common tick-borne illness in North America, Europe, and Asia.1 Early diagnosis and treatment lead to a recovery in many patients, but a complex multi-symptom, multi-system chronic condition can develop when Lyme is left untreated or treatment fails. 

Although it wouldn’t have a name or known causative agent for nearly one hundred years, Lyme disease research dates back to 1883 when a German physician, Alfred Buchwald, recorded serious deterioration of skin tissue called acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA). We now recognize ACA as a classic symptom of late stage European Lyme disease. 

In 1908, when Swedish dermatologist Arvid Afzelius first described the classic Lyme-related bullseye rash, erythema migrans (EM), he suspected it may have resulted from a tick bite but couldn’t prove it.Just over a decade later, the  first case of neurologic Lyme (Lyme neuroborreliosis) was reported by Garin and Bujadoux. Then, in 1940, similar cases of nerve pain radiating from the spine after tick bites were reported in Germany by Bannwarth, and the condition was recognized as Garin–Bujadoux–Bannwarth syndrome.

The name “Lyme disease” comes from the town of Lyme, Connecticut, where it was first described as a separate illness in 1975 when a group of 51 children and adults reported arthritis-like symptoms, including pain and swelling in large joints, headaches, fever, weakness, skin rash, and fatigue. They coined the condition Lyme but didn’t know the cause. 

Several years later in 1981, scientist Willy Burgdorfer discovered a new corkscrew-shaped bacterium, a spirochete, in the gut of deer ticks while studying rocky mountain spotted fever. This new spirochete, which was called Borrelia burgdorferi after Burgdorfer, was determined to be the causative agent in Lyme disease. 

While emerging research suggests Lyme could be transmitted sexually or gestationally, via blood transfusion, or by mosquitoes, we’re certain humans get Lyme disease from tick bites infected with one of 18 known species of Borrelia that cause Lyme. Borrelia burgdorferi, spread by the black-legged tick, commonly called a deer tick, causes nearly all cases of Lyme disease in North America. Borrelia mayonii represents fewer cases, as it’s found only in the upper Midwest. In Europe and Asia, Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii are primarily responsible. 

While ticks of any age can transmit Lyme, the danger lies in tiny, immature ticks called nymphs that are barely visible to the naked eye. The size of a poppy seed or pinhead, they often feed in hard-to-see areas like the groin or scalp. Since most tick bites are painless, they remain undetected while they suck the host’s blood for several days before becoming engorged and detaching to continue their life cycle. 

If a human or animal host has Lyme (or another tick-borne disease), the tick could contract and carry it to future hosts, including you. Typically, ticks must feed for 36 hours to transmit Lyme while other infections can be transmitted in a matter of minutes or seconds. The longer a tick is attached, the greater your chance of contracting a tick-borne illness. 

In the United States, Lyme disease is most commonly reported in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, North-Central, and Pacific Coast regions. You’re more likely to get Lyme if you live in one of these areas and spend a lot of time outdoors. If you’re bitten by a tick, you should get tested for Lyme as soon as possible, no matter where you live. Just reach out to one of our patient care coordinators to set up testing today.

If you live in a Lyme-endemic area, you’re probably well aware of common Lyme Disease prevention strategies, primarily protecting yourself against ticks and any exposed skin they may be attracted to. Our recommendations for the prevention of tick-borne illness are non-toxic and start before you leave your home to explore the great outdoors.

Permethrin is a non-toxic insecticide that’s registered for use by the Environmental Protection Agency. It’s a synthetic version of pyrethrum, a natural insecticide produced from the chrysanthemum flower. Permethrin is applied to your clothing and gear only, never to your skin. Clothing should be light-colored with a fairly tight weave so you can easily spot ticks. You can also line the perimeter of your property with permethrin, making it a less hospitable habitat. It lasts for six weeks or six washings and repels or kills ticks and mosquitos on contact. Treat all of your outdoor clothing and gear with Permethrin as the first step in Lyme disease prevention.

Before you leave the house, cover all your skin with your Permethrin-treated clothing, including your head, ears, and neck. Tuck your pants into your socks. Then use a 30% lemon-eucalyptus insect repellent on your clothing and skin. We don’t recommend repellent containing DEET, as it’s absorbed into the body and is neurotoxic.

While you hike, camp, hunt, or garden, try to avoid thick vegetation and leaf litter. Stay in the center of trails and avoid brushing against trees. After outdoor activity, wash your clothing and then dry on high for at least 30 minutes to kill any ticks. Do a tick check on all members of your family, including your pets, as they can get Lyme disease, too, and may carry ticks into your house. Make sure to have someone else examine hard-to-see places like your back and scalp.

If you find a tick that’s already attached, remove it safely and promptly. There is a correct way to remove a tick so it’s less likely to get irritated and release saliva that may contain Lyme or other diseases.

  1.  Using a tweezer, pinch the tick as close to the bite site as possible.
  2. Pull gently using even pressure but never twist or jerk. The mouth may detach from the body and stay in the skin. Sometimes this happens no matter how careful you are. Try to pull the mouth from the skin after cleaning the tweezers. If you don’t succeed, leave it there.
  3. Clean the bite site and your hands with soap and water and wipe with rubbing alcohol.
  4. Do not crush or puncture the tick body. If the tick is alive, put it in alcohol to kill it. Place it in a bag, as you may want to send it in for testing to see if it was infected with Borrelia bacteria or coinfections.
  5. Contact your doctor. ILADS guidelines recommend black-legged tick bites be treated with 20 days of doxycycline. If you still develop flu-like symptoms or an EM rash, consider comprehensive testing to confirm Lyme as well as any coinfections. Brio Medical Lyme team physicians can assess your symptoms and order the necessary labs as the first step in addressing tick-borne illness after a confirmed bite.

 A single tick bite can cause a lifetime of consequences. With a few simple precautions, you can significantly decrease your risk of acquiring Lyme disease. Remember, prevention is the best treatment.

Permethrin is a non-toxic insecticide that’s registered for use by the Environmental Protection Agency. It’s a synthetic version of pyrethrum, a natural insecticide produced from the chrysanthemum flower.

Permethrin is applied to your clothing and gear only, never to your skin. Clothing should be light-colored with a fairly tight weave so you can easily spot ticks. You can also line the perimeter of your property with permethrin, making it a less hospitable habitat.

It lasts for six weeks or six washings and repels or kills ticks and mosquitos on contact. Treat all of your outdoor clothing and gear with Permethrin as the first step in Lyme disease prevention.

Although it wouldn’t have a name or known causative agent for nearly one hundred years, Lyme disease research dates back to 1883 when a German physician, Alfred Buchwald, recorded serious deterioration of skin tissue called acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA). We now recognize ACA as a classic symptom of late stage European Lyme disease. 

In 1908, when Swedish dermatologist Arvid Afzelius first described the classic Lyme-related bullseye rash, erythema migrans (EM), he suspected it may have resulted from a tick bite but couldn’t prove it.Just over a decade later, the  first case of neurologic Lyme (Lyme neuroborreliosis) was reported by Garin and Bujadoux. Then, in 1940, similar cases of nerve pain radiating from the spine after tick bites were reported in Germany by Bannwarth, and the condition was recognized as Garin–Bujadoux–Bannwarth syndrome.

The name “Lyme disease” comes from the town of Lyme, Connecticut, where it was first described as a separate illness in 1975 when a group of 51 children and adults reported arthritis-like symptoms, including pain and swelling in large joints, headaches, fever, weakness, skin rash, and fatigue. They coined the condition Lyme but didn’t know the cause. 

Several years later in 1981, scientist Willy Burgdorfer discovered a new corkscrew-shaped bacterium, a spirochete, in the gut of deer ticks while studying rocky mountain spotted fever. This new spirochete, which was called Borrelia burgdorferi after Burgdorfer, was determined to be the causative agent in Lyme disease. 

While emerging research suggests Lyme could be transmitted sexually or gestationally, via blood transfusion, or by mosquitoes, we’re certain humans get Lyme disease from tick bites infected with one of 18 known species of Borrelia that cause Lyme. Borrelia burgdorferi, spread by the black-legged tick, commonly called a deer tick, causes nearly all cases of Lyme disease in North America. Borrelia mayonii represents fewer cases, as it’s found only in the upper Midwest. In Europe and Asia, Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii are primarily responsible. 

While ticks of any age can transmit Lyme, the danger lies in tiny, immature ticks called nymphs that are barely visible to the naked eye. The size of a poppy seed or pinhead, they often feed in hard-to-see areas like the groin or scalp. Since most tick bites are painless, they remain undetected while they suck the host’s blood for several days before becoming engorged and detaching to continue their life cycle. 

If a human or animal host has Lyme (or another tick-borne disease), the tick could contract and carry it to future hosts, including you. Typically, ticks must feed for 36 hours to transmit Lyme while other infections can be transmitted in a matter of minutes or seconds. The longer a tick is attached, the greater your chance of contracting a tick-borne illness. 

In the United States, Lyme disease is most commonly reported in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, North-Central, and Pacific Coast regions. You’re more likely to get Lyme if you live in one of these areas and spend a lot of time outdoors. If you’re bitten by a tick, you should get tested for Lyme as soon as possible, no matter where you live. Just reach out to one of our patient care coordinators to set up testing today.

If you live in a Lyme-endemic area, you’re probably well aware of common Lyme Disease prevention strategies, primarily protecting yourself against ticks and any exposed skin they may be attracted to. Our recommendations for the prevention of tick-borne illness are non-toxic and start before you leave your home to explore the great outdoors.

Permethrin is a non-toxic insecticide that’s registered for use by the Environmental Protection Agency. It’s a synthetic version of pyrethrum, a natural insecticide produced from the chrysanthemum flower. Permethrin is applied to your clothing and gear only, never to your skin. Clothing should be light-colored with a fairly tight weave so you can easily spot ticks. You can also line the perimeter of your property with permethrin, making it a less hospitable habitat. It lasts for six weeks or six washings and repels or kills ticks and mosquitos on contact. Treat all of your outdoor clothing and gear with Permethrin as the first step in Lyme disease prevention.

Before you leave the house, cover all your skin with your Permethrin-treated clothing, including your head, ears, and neck. Tuck your pants into your socks. Then use a 30% lemon-eucalyptus insect repellent on your clothing and skin. We don’t recommend repellent containing DEET, as it’s absorbed into the body and is neurotoxic.

While you hike, camp, hunt, or garden, try to avoid thick vegetation and leaf litter. Stay in the center of trails and avoid brushing against trees. After outdoor activity, wash your clothing and then dry on high for at least 30 minutes to kill any ticks. Do a tick check on all members of your family, including your pets, as they can get Lyme disease, too, and may carry ticks into your house. Make sure to have someone else examine hard-to-see places like your back and scalp.

If you find a tick that’s already attached, remove it safely and promptly. There is a correct way to remove a tick so it’s less likely to get irritated and release saliva that may contain Lyme or other diseases.

  1.  Using a tweezer, pinch the tick as close to the bite site as possible.
  2. Pull gently using even pressure but never twist or jerk. The mouth may detach from the body and stay in the skin. Sometimes this happens no matter how careful you are. Try to pull the mouth from the skin after cleaning the tweezers. If you don’t succeed, leave it there.
  3. Clean the bite site and your hands with soap and water and wipe with rubbing alcohol.
  4. Do not crush or puncture the tick body. If the tick is alive, put it in alcohol to kill it. Place it in a bag, as you may want to send it in for testing to see if it was infected with Borrelia bacteria or coinfections.
  5. Contact your doctor. ILADS guidelines recommend black-legged tick bites be treated with 20 days of doxycycline. If you still develop flu-like symptoms or an EM rash, consider comprehensive testing to confirm Lyme as well as any coinfections. Brio Medical Lyme team physicians can assess your symptoms and order the necessary labs as the first step in addressing tick-borne illness after a confirmed bite.

 A single tick bite can cause a lifetime of consequences. With a few simple precautions, you can significantly decrease your risk of acquiring Lyme disease. Remember, prevention is the best treatment.

Symptoms of Lyme Disease

Lyme symptoms are characterized by three progressive stages of the disease: early localized, early disseminated and late disseminated (chronic). Symptoms generally include rash, swelling, headache, fever, and fatigue, but Lyme is called “The Great Imitator” because its symptoms are virtually indistinguishable from over 350 other conditions. Without confirmation of a tick bite or the presence of a skin rash, Lyme Disease is commonly misdiagnosed, delaying critical treatment.

Early localized or acute Lyme disease is the first stage with symptoms usually beginning a few hours to a few weeks after the tick bite. It’s possible for you to not notice symptoms during stage one, remaining unaware of the infection until more serious symptoms arise during later stages. 

One of the first signs of infection during stage one is the bullseye-shaped rash erythema migrans (EM), but reports indicate it only appears in approximately 30-70% of people. The rash may be a solid red rash or a ring and is caused by the spirochete bacteria spreading away from the bite location through the skin. It measures anywhere from two to 12 inches across. Flu-like symptoms are also typical and include:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Neck stiffness
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Swollen lymph nodes

Lyme treatment is most effective during stage one. If untreated, symptoms get worse as the infection spreads.

Stage two is called early disseminated Lyme disease, as the infection is no longer localized to the tick bite site but has started to spread or disseminate to different areas of the body, potentially affecting the heart, nervous system, joints, and skin. 

As the infection spreads, the EM rash may continue to expand with rashes potentially appearing on other parts of the body. Flu-like symptoms worsen, and these additional symptoms are often reported:

  • Sweating
  • Loss of breath
  • Recurrent fainting
  • Conjunctivitis (pinkeye) 
  • Bell’s palsy (facial paralysis)
  • Heart palpitations (rapid heartbeat)
  • Impaired concentration and memory
  • Pain, weakness, tingling, or numbness in the limbs
  • Inflammation (pain, redness, and swelling) in knees or other large joints

 

Early disseminated Lyme is most often diagnosed from one month after infection to four months after infection and results from a missed diagnoses, a misdiagnoses, or ineffective treatment.  

Late disseminated Lyme disease is typically diagnosed from three months after infection to 36 months after infection but onset may be years later. In this stage, the spirochetes have spread throughout the body, producing severe symptoms such as arthritis and advanced neurological or cardiac symptoms that may include:

 

  • Chronic fatigue
  • Dizziness that causes falls
  • Heart rhythm disturbances 
  • Constant stiff or aching neck
  • Frequent headaches or migraines
  • Brain fog or inability to concentrate 
  • Insomnia or frequent sleep disturbances
  • Tingling and numbness in limbs that makes movement difficult 
  • Trouble recalling words, conversing, and processing information
  • Severe arthritis or migrating pains that come and go in multiple joints

Late disseminated Lyme disease may become a chronic condition. In 10-20% of cases, treatment fails and symptoms persist. Even if Lyme Disease treatment is initially effective, some patients continue to have recurrent flares.

You could go months or years without signs of Lyme only to have all your symptoms suddenly return. Then there are people who suffer from symptoms for years before ever receiving confirmation of and treatment for a Lyme diagnosis. 

Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS) is a term the medical community uses for a specific subset of patients with symptoms that persist after treatment, even in the absence of a clinically detectable infection.

A diagnosis of Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS) is made when a confirmed case of Lyme has resolved after generally-accepted treatment but is followed with the onset of subjective symptoms such as fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, or cognitive difficulties within six months of the original diagnosis and continue for at least six months after treatment, causing a serious decline in quality of life. Scientists estimate that as many as 2 million people in the United States may suffer from Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS) today. 

The line between Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS) and chronic Lyme disease is blurry. The mainstream medical establishment doesn’t even recognize chronic Lyme as a real condition. Because of this, many medical doctors simply don’t know what to do with the onset of Lyme-related symptoms after treatment. They might tell you they can’t help you or even suggest you have psychological issues.

If you’re struggling with the burden of Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS) or chronic Lyme disease, we are here to help hold you up...literally if we have to. We’ve worked with enough late-stage Lyme sufferers to know you’re not inventing your pain and suffering, even if you’re experiencing symptoms no other patient has reported. 

If you’re in this position, you probably already know that antibiotics alone are ineffective in late-stage Lyme disease. That’s why our team has created a holistic Lyme disease protocol that relies on natural, non-toxic personalized medicine to optimize your immune system’s ability to take back your body and put Lyme into permanent remission.

What is Brio-Care?

The Brio-Care System is about leaning and implementing modalities that bring functionality and vigor to your daily life. Not only that, but Brio-Care is also empowering you to have energy and enjoyment you thought was a thing of the past. Brio-Care is about bridging the gaps that past disease or problems might have left as unattended health problems. By doing all these you will not only reach and maintain these goals, you will also obtain all the benefits. The Brio-Care Systems’ approach to wellness focuses on the continuum support with our utmost care to obtain a constant, conscious pursuit of a healthier life.

The Brio-Care Wellness Program is carefully personalized to meet individual needs, whether healthy or dealing with a new or ongoing diagnosis. We are on a quest for vibrant quality of life throughout our lifespan and we desired extended active life.

None of us want to be incapacitated during what should be our golden years. Right now, you may be feeling quite well, but you know you could feel better or feel as vibrant as before. Our desire for abundant health is confronted by the actual growing incidence of dysfunction and finally overt chronic disease.

What Are Lyme Disease Co-infections?

Ticks can carry and transmit more than just Borrelia, the primary pathogen responsible for a Lyme Disease infection. You can get infected with multiple species of bacteria, parasites, viruses, and fungi with a single tick bite. Alternatively, you may have contracted them earlier and carried them unaware, only to have them take advantage of your weakened immune system during a Lyme infection. These coexisting foreign invaders are called co-infections.

The most common co-infections in the United States are borreliosis, babesiosis, Bartonella, anaplasmosis, tick-borne relapsing fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, powassan virus, and tularemia. You may also test positive for mycoplasma, chlamydia, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpes viruses, herpes simplex viruses, and herpes zoster virus, and many others. Depending on your symptoms and health exams, your Brio-care medical team may order tests to confirm any of these when defining your custom treatment protocol.

Babesiosis is a common Lyme disease coinfection. It’s caused by Babesia parasites, most often B. microtia,  which infect red blood cells. Babesia is transmitted by the same ticks that carry Lyme disease, the black-legged tick, but it can also be transmitted during blood transfusions or congenitally from mother to baby. Symptoms of Babesiosis include fever, chills, headache, fatigue, hot flashes, nausea, dark urine, and more. It becomes serious with the onset of thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hemodynamic instability, acute respiratory distress, renal failure, hepatic compromise, and altered mental status.

Bartonella is a bacteria that invades red blood cells and blood vessel lining. Inside these cells, it evades the immune system response, leading to persistent infection.

Bartonellosis is one of Lyme’s most serious coinfections, producing symptoms that include headache, fatigue, swollen glands, and a streaked rash in the early stages.

Neurological symptoms are common, including encephalopathy, a form of brain damage or disease that may lead to seizures.

Cognitive dysfunction and central nervous system lesions sometimes occur. Bartonella is the cause of more serious conditions, including cat scratch disease, Carrion’s disease, and trench fever.

Anaplasmosis is caused by the bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Fever, chills, muscle aches, brain fog, and headache are common symptoms, but bleeding issues, organ failure, and respiratory failure can occur in the later stages of the illness. While nearly every infection causes white blood cells to increase, white blood cells go down with anaplasmosis. Elevated liver enzymes and low platelets are other diagnostic indicators of infection.

Tick-borne relapsing fever is a bacterial infection that can cause fever that comes and goes, headache, muscle pain, joint aches, and nausea. The fever pattern is often characterized by three days with high fever followed by seven days without fever and another three days with a fever. If left untreated, this cycle continues. TBRF is usually carried by soft ticks who nest near rodent dens and come out at night to feed on the host, similar to bed bugs. Exposure often occurs in remote cabins in the western United States, where the ticks live in the walls or attic. Another form of TBRF, Borrelia miyamotoi disease, is known as “hard tick relapsing fever,” as the black-legged tick, which has a hard body, transmits B. miyamotoi.

 

Ehrlichiosis is an umbrella term for the diseases caused by the bacteria Ehrlichia chaffeensis, E. ewingii, or E. muris eauclairensis. Spread by both the black-legged tick and lone star tick, symptoms include fever, chills, muscle aches, headache, and upset stomach. Transmission by blood transfusion and organ transplant have also occurred. About one-third of people develop a rash that begins five days after the onset of fever and appears as either red splotches or dots. Late-stage ehrlichiosis can cause inflammation of the brain and surrounding tissue (meningoencephalitis), uncontrolled bleeding, and respiratory or organ failure. 

Powassan virus is still considered rare, although reported cases have increased in recent years. Ticks contract the virus from rodents that carry it in their blood. Infected ticks transmit Powassan to humans during a bite, but ticks cannot contract it from humans, as we do not develop high enough levels of the virus. Therefore, humans are considered “dead-end” hosts for the Powassan virus. Some people never show symptoms, but the onset of illness usually occurs from one week to one month after the bite, causing fever, headache, weakness, and vomiting. As the virus spreads, it may infect the brain (encephalitis) or the tissue around the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Advanced symptoms include loss of coordination, confusion, difficulty speaking, and seizures, as well as chronic headaches, loss of muscle mass and strength, and memory issues. Unfortunately, one out of ten with severe Powassan virus will lose their life.

Tularemia is an infection caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis that affects the eyes, skin, lungs, and lymph nodes. Also known as deer fly fever or rabbit fever, there are several subsets of Tularemia with distinctive symptoms that typically show up between three and five days after exposure and often include ulcers.

Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial infection characterized by fever, headache, and rash. It can be deadly if not treated early and accurately. The rash often develops on the soles of the feet and hands two to four days after the onset of fever and later spreads to other areas of the body. The rash may appear as pinpoint spots or larger red splotches. After recovery, patients could be left with paralysis, mental disability, hearing loss, or permanent damage to the blood vessels, leading to amputation of fingers, toes, arms, or legs.

As Lyme Disease symptoms, co-infections, and mycotoxins overlap, there is much difficulty in identifying the root cause of particular symptoms without targeted laboratory testing to determine what infection or multiple infections are present. Unfortunately, it’s not yet standard protocol in the mainstream medical community to test for co-infections unless there’s a positive Lyme disease test. But it’s absolutely possible to have one or more of these co-infections without having Lyme disease.

That is exactly why Brio Medical Center partners with cutting-edge laboratories worldwide that make tick-borne illness their business. These laboratories provide answers you need through research and development initiatives that produce precision tests for Borrelia and its coinfections. By analyzing your test results, we’re able to determine the root cause of your condition and create a customized treatment plan with proven therapies that’ll restore your vigor and get you back to feeling like your best self again.

The Brio-Medical Story

Brio-Medical Founder Rusty Roberts - Alternative Lyme DIsease clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona
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Brio-Medical was started by the son of a stage-4 cancer patient. She lived an additional 12 years when no conventional doctor gave her 12 weeks to live. After having a horrible experience with chemotherapy, she went to Mexico for treatments, and within just 3 weeks of natural treatments they wiped away 22 tumors in her upper abdomen. They saved her life when no conventional doctor even thought it was possible. It was the most amazing transformation we had ever witnessed. Her experience inspired us to become advocates for others who were searching for their own amazing story.

Over the years it was evident that most people go to Mexico for treatment not because they want to, but rather because they feel they have no choice. We knew the Lord was laying it on our hearts to bring the best of those lifesaving treatments of Mexico to the USA. We had no idea as to how we would open a successful, lifesaving clinic, but we knew the Lord would do it for us when the time was right. In late 2019, just after Thanksgiving, we opened the doors on Brio-Medical. We’ve seen many God-given miracles since that day. The Lord has blessed us with a wonderful clinic to help others find vitality, hope, and vigor.  

-Rusty Roberts, Brio-Medical CEO

Brio-Medical Treatment Philosophy

Guiding Principles To Hope And Healing

All Treatment Programs Are Individualized. One Size Does Not Fit All! The Treatment Plan Designed For You Will Be Based On Personal History, Physical Exam, Labs, Imaging, Medications, Allergies, And Your Overall Health. When You Are Seriously Sick You Need Serious Help. Brio-Medical, Combines Natural Supplement IV’s Along With Specialized Equipment To Boost The Bodies Ability To Respond To Disease And Injury. This Is Where Hope Is Restored Thanks To Our Highly Trained Staff And Our Unique Combination Of Treatments & Therapies.

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Principle 1:

Your Biology Is Controlled By Your Thoughts

All Treatment Programs Are Individualized. One Size Does Not Fit All! The Treatment Plan Designed For You Will Be Based On Personal History, Physical Exam, Labs, Imaging, Medications, Allergies, And Your Overall Health. When You Are Seriously Sick You Need Serious Help. Brio-Medical, Combines Natural Supplement IV’s Along With Specialized Equipment To Boost The Bodies Ability To Respond To Disease And Injury. This Is Where Hope Is Restored Thanks To Our Highly Trained Staff And Our Unique Combination Of Treatments & Therapies.

Principle 2:

Eat Healthy Food

That Is Organic, Non-Gmo, Whole Foods. This Also Includes Avoiding Refined Sugars Like Sodas, Cakes, Candies, And Anything With High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS). HFCS Is A Genetically Modified Product. Fruits Are Acceptable But Juice Should Be Limited To Leafy Green Vegetables With A Granny Smith Apple To Taste. The Idea Is To Avoid A Spike In Blood Sugar And Subsequent Strong Insulin Response.

Principle 3:

Drink Plenty of Water

The Body Consists Of About 60-70% Water. Water Loss By The Body Is Termed Sensible, Loss From Urine And Stool Or Insensible, Loss From Respiration And Evaporation (Sweating). Water Is Lost By The Body All The Time Which Is Why It Needs To Be Replenished. The Body Needs Water For Digestion, Excretion, Absorption, Circulation And Regulation Of Body Temperature.

Principle 4:

Get Some Sleep

The Majority Of Americans Suffer From Sleep Deprivation Which Causes Mental, Emotional And Physical Fatigue. Sleep Debt Has An Effect On The Immune System And Healing. Research Has Shown In Mammalian Models That Animals Who Get More Sleep Have Higher Levels Of White Blood Cells (WBCs) Which Are Paramount To An Immune Response. Inadequate Sleep Is Also Associated With Breast, Prostate And Colon Cancers.

Principle 5:

Detoxification

Most Cancers Take Years To Form. The Standard American Diet (SAD) Including Alcohol Creates An Acidic And Inflammatory Environment In The Body That Leads To A Number Of Health Issues Including Diabetes. Then Take Into Account A Daily Bombardment Of Environmental Toxins (Toxicants), Such As Cigarette Smoke, Diesel Fuels, Pesticides, Herbicides, Pollution, Toxic Metals, And GMOs, Etc That Further Elevates The Total Toxic Burden Of The Body. No Wonder Chronic Illness Is On The Rise!

Principle 6:

Supplementation

Specific Nutrients, Vitamins, Minerals, Fatty Acids, Adaptogens, Botanicals, Etc That Are Used To Replete The Body From Depleted States. As The Immune System Becomes Strengthened And The Toxic Burden Reduced, The Body Can Start To Heal. Quality Of Supplements Vary, So Discuss With Your Naturopathic Or Integrative Practitioner Before Purchasing.

Principle 7:

Exercise

There Are So Many Benefits To Exercise And Movement. Exercise Makes You Feel More Energetic And Healthier And It Positively Impacts The Immune System. Exercise Eases Depression And Anxiety And Reduces Chronic Stress By Slowing Down The Release Of Stress Hormones.

Principle 8:

Balancing The Milieu

This Is The Internal Terrain Of The Body. Our Body Hosts White Blood Cells, Red Blood Cells, Hormones And Even Microorganisms To Name A Few. For Example, Bacteria Is Needed In The Gut To Promote Digestion And Metabolism Of Food And Produce Vitamins B12 And K. These Good Bacteria Are Killed By A Number Of Things Including Antibiotics, Anesthesia, And Heavy Metals Which Can Lead To An Overpopulation Of Pathogenic Bacteria And Even Candida In The Gut. Balancing This Terrain Is Important Because Everyone Always Has Cancer Cells. Fortunately We Also Have Mechanisms In Place That Such As Tumor Suppressor Genes That Protect Cells. Balancing The Body’s Internal Environment Is Done By Incorporating The Above Principles And Letting It Becoming Your Lifestyle.

Principle 9:

IV Therapy And Specialized Equipment

When You Are Seriously Sick You Need Serious Help. Brio-Medical, Combines Natural Supplement IV’s Along With Specialized Equipment To Boost The Bodies Ability To Respond To Disease And Injury. This Is Where Hope Is Restored Thanks To Our Highly Trained Staff And Our Unique Combination Of Treatments & Therapies.

The greatest testimony to the benefits and results of the treatments offered at Brio-Medical comes from the inspiring stories told by actual patients and their families. From helpless PET scans to Western Blot Tests indicating no positive bands, we can say that our research and dedication have made a difference in the lives of our patients. Don’t take our word for it, please take a moment to watch these amazing stories and know that we are always ready and eager to make a difference in your life or the life of a loved one who may be dealing with chronic illness.

I Saw Dr Kollin For Cancer Prevention. In 2014 I Had Pain On The Left Side Which Occasionally Radiated To My Left Breast. An U/S Showed Nothing But Fibrous Breasts. The Origin Of The Pain Could Never Be Pinpointed. She Had Me Apply A Lotion To My Torso Daily. After A Few Months, I Began To Have Eruptions Under The Left Breast And Increased The Lotion Applications As Instructed. The Eruptions Progressed, The Pain On The Left Side Increased. After 4 Months The Eruptions Stopped And The Skin Healed. The Pain On The Left Side Is Gone. Follow Up U/S Has Shown That The Breasts Are No Longer Fibrous. Incidentally, They Are No Longer Tender When Menstruating. I Am So Thankful For Dr. Kollin. She Listened And Supported Me. She Is Truly Caring."

AB, Cancer Patient
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